Issues

Innovation policies and ecosystemsback to issues

Policy-makers are faced with the task of translating a wealth of information about innovation, trade, global supply chains, trends in technology, and other factors into laws and regulations. Below we provide business perspectives on what governments can do to support entrepreneurship, attract foreign technology partners, facilitate technology deployment and the diffusion of know-how, and reinforce domestic innovative capacity.


  • STANDARDS and PATENTS

    Submitted at the ITU Patent Roundtable, this Innovation Insights submission observes that IPR policies of Standard-setting Organizations are working well and do not require modification.  The paper highlights the need for IP systems to be business model-neutral and aimed at stimluating innovation over the long-term.  It advises against modification of IP incentives in response to requests from certain stakeholders that may benefit from reduced IPR protection, as this could slow the emergence of new and disruptive solutions. 

  • PHARMACEUTICAL INNOVATION in EMERGING MARKETS

    This report, published jointly by IFPMA and Charles River Associates, reviews the factors that contribute to pharmaceutical innovation in middle-income countries, from early stage discovery to product development and commercialization, including but not only effective IP systems.  The report focuses on eight countries (Brazil, China, Colombia, India, Malaysia, Russia, South Africa and South Korea) and recommends that policy-makers prioritize industrial and health policy coherence, coordination between private and public sector entities, and enactment of robust and long-term innovation strategies.

  • CUTTING THROUGH “PATENT WARS” HYPE

    Debates about the so-called smart phone patent wars have generated a lot of heat in recent years.  Some claim that patents are holding back innovation in the ICT sector and that patent systems should be reformed.  In this paper, legal scholar Adam Mossoff disagrees, explaining that the proliferation of competing patent and other IP claims on smartphone technology is not a uniquely 21st century phenomenon. The Mossoff paper was the subject of this blog.

Pages